The International Association for Impact Assessment (IAIA) is the world's leading professional association in the field of impact assessment.

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Urban development in the Lower Mainland often requires some level of environmental assessment (EA) to meet federal, provincial or local government requirements. Urban EAs are often triggered for projects that involve watercourse setbacks, instream works or other environmental sensitivities. The scope and process vary between jurisdictions but some common EA triggers, tools and methods are […]

Our previous Organized Reasoning workshops were well received in Vancouver, Victoria, Whitehorse, Calgary and Yellowknife. Similar workshops have been given to staff at several government agencies. We want to provide our members with access to these tools as long as there is interest, so we are presenting one more in Vancouver and making a list […]

This workshop has been postponed. Please stay tuned for a new date. —————————————————————————————- Environmental impact assessment constantly uses reasoning to reach conclusions. That process is called ‘argument’—not meaning ‘quarrel,’ but meaning a series of reasons, leading to conclusions, targeted for a specific audience. Most professionals are not formally trained in organized reasoning. Therefore they do […]

INCORPORATING HEALTH INTO ENVIRONMENTAL/IMPACT ASSESSMENT FOR MAJOR PROJECTS: BEST PRACTICE FOR BC, CANADA 1-Day Training Workshop November 17th 2015: Vancouver, Canada Topics will include: Key community health risks and impacts Ethical standards and data access protocols Study design and methodological approaches Meeting the OCAP (Ownership, Control, Access, Protection) standards Download PDF for Full Details MANAGING COMMUNITY HEALTH AND SAFETY […]

Organized Reasoning and Environmental Assessment A Workshop From IAIA-Western and Northern Canada in Calgary Environmental impact assessment constantly uses reasoning to reach conclusions. That process is called ‘argument’. Not argument meaning ‘quarrel,’ but argument meaning a series of reasons, leading to conclusions, targeted for a specific audience. Most professionals are not formally trained in organized reasoning. […]